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Willie Was Different: The Tale of an Ugly Thrushling

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Willie Was Different: The Tale of an Ugly Thrushling

Signed by:

Autographed Hardcover Edition
- Autographed Hardcover Edition of "Willie Was Different"
- Norman & Molly Rockwell's Signatures inside Book
- Certificate of Authenticity
$1,200.00

This Hardcover Edition of Norman Rockwell's Willie Was Different: The Tale of an Ugly Thrushling is autographed by Norman & Molly Rockwell.

Signed by Molly & Norman Rockwell

Condition:

Book is dirty and Dust Jacket. has water-damage. The Signatures are crisp and undamaged.  Signed by both Norman and Molly Rockwell.

About the Book

A sweet story of a bird who sang a different song. From the blurb: "Change the color of the moon - it must have changed its hue, of late - for this is a book that comes but once in a blue moon." Dust Jacket has Rockwell illustration in color on the front.

Get your Norman Rockwell autographed book today!

Product Details

  • Pages: 42 pages
  • Publisher:
  • Release Date: June 01, 1969
  • ISBN-13: 9780308703803
  • Edition: Autographed Hardcover Edition

About The Author

Rockwell was born in New York City in 1894, and he wanted to be an artist from a very early age. He dropped out of high school to attend art school, and he was a highly focused student at the National Academy of Design and, later, at the Art Students League in New York City, where he studied under Thomas Fogarty and George Bridgman.

In 1961, Rockwell married Molly Punderson, a retired teacher. Two years later, he ended his 47-year association with The Saturday Evening Post and began to work for Look magazine. During his 10-year association with Look, Rockwell painted pictures illustrating some of his deepest concerns and interests, including civil rights, America’s war on poverty, and the exploration of space.

In 1973, Rockwell established a trust to preserve his artistic legacy by placing his works in the custodianship of the Old Corner House Stockbridge Historical Society, later to become Norman Rockwell Museum at Stockbridge. The trust now forms the core of the Museum’s permanent collections. In 1976, in failing health, Rockwell became concerned about the future of his studio. He arranged to have his studio and its contents added to the trust. In 1977, Rockwell received the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He died peacefully at his home in Stockbridge on November 8, 1978, at the age of 84.

Rockwell died in 1978, and currently there is a growing interest in his work.

Product Details

This Hardcover Edition of Norman Rockwell's Willie Was Different: The Tale of an Ugly Thrushling is autographed by Norman & Molly Rockwell.

Signed by Molly & Norman Rockwell

Condition:

Book is dirty and Dust Jacket. has water-damage. The Signatures are crisp and undamaged.  Signed by both Norman and Molly Rockwell.

About the Book

A sweet story of a bird who sang a different song. From the blurb: "Change the color of the moon - it must have changed its hue, of late - for this is a book that comes but once in a blue moon." Dust Jacket has Rockwell illustration in color on the front.

Get your Norman Rockwell autographed book today!

Product Details

  • Pages: 42 pages
  • Publisher:
  • Release Date: June 01, 1969
  • ISBN-13: 9780308703803
  • Edition: Autographed Hardcover Edition

About The Author

Rockwell was born in New York City in 1894, and he wanted to be an artist from a very early age. He dropped out of high school to attend art school, and he was a highly focused student at the National Academy of Design and, later, at the Art Students League in New York City, where he studied under Thomas Fogarty and George Bridgman.

In 1961, Rockwell married Molly Punderson, a retired teacher. Two years later, he ended his 47-year association with The Saturday Evening Post and began to work for Look magazine. During his 10-year association with Look, Rockwell painted pictures illustrating some of his deepest concerns and interests, including civil rights, America’s war on poverty, and the exploration of space.

In 1973, Rockwell established a trust to preserve his artistic legacy by placing his works in the custodianship of the Old Corner House Stockbridge Historical Society, later to become Norman Rockwell Museum at Stockbridge. The trust now forms the core of the Museum’s permanent collections. In 1976, in failing health, Rockwell became concerned about the future of his studio. He arranged to have his studio and its contents added to the trust. In 1977, Rockwell received the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He died peacefully at his home in Stockbridge on November 8, 1978, at the age of 84.

Rockwell died in 1978, and currently there is a growing interest in his work.

Weight:
16.00 Ounces
About the Author

Rockwell was born in New York City in 1894, and he wanted to be an artist from a very early age. He dropped out of high school to attend art school, and he was a highly focused student at the National Academy of Design and, later, at the Art Students League in New York City, where he studied under Thomas Fogarty and George Bridgman.

In 1961, Rockwell married Molly Punderson, a retired teacher. Two years later, he ended his 47-year association with The Saturday Evening Post and began to work for Look magazine. During his 10-year association with Look, Rockwell painted pictures illustrating some of his deepest concerns and interests, including civil rights, America’s war on poverty, and the exploration of space.

In 1973, Rockwell established a trust to preserve his artistic legacy by placing his works in the custodianship of the Old Corner House Stockbridge Historical Society, later to become Norman Rockwell Museum at Stockbridge. The trust now forms the core of the Museum’s permanent collections. In 1976, in failing health, Rockwell became concerned about the future of his studio. He arranged to have his studio and its contents added to the trust. In 1977, Rockwell received the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He died peacefully at his home in Stockbridge on November 8, 1978, at the age of 84.

Rockwell died in 1978, and currently there is a growing interest in his work.